MALE NURSE DISCRIMINATION...DOES IT EXIST?

male nurse discrimination

Male Nurse discrimination does exist and is alive and well. My  Husband has been a nurse for many, many years and has faced discrimination his entire nursing career. He has broken his neck lifting a 300LB patient for a female nurse who "Just could not lift someone that heavy". Why should we expect male nurses to take up the slack, when female nurses get paid the same as male nurses?. It simply isn't fair.

There are gender stereotypes in  every profession and nursing is no exception. There have been many incidences of female patients verbalizing to a male nurse that they do not want to be cared for by them and would prefer a female nurse. 

Gender discrimination is classified as  "any exclusion, distinction or restriction made that is made on the basis of socially constructed gender roles and norms, which prevents a person from enjoying the full human rights that they deserve". In some countries Men are excluded from midwifery. It is not common to see male nurses in the role of lactation consultant. Female nurses are chosen over male nurses for positions in obstetrics and gynecology. Senior positions sometimes discriminate against male nurses, such as director of nursing positions. 

Since nursing faculty is comprised of mainly women, many curriculums are directed at female nurses, while in turn ignoring males and their needs. In Florence Nightingale's era Nursing was identified as a feminine way of caring for patients, excluding Men because "their horny hands were detrimental to caring". In clinical rotations they are very rarely assigned female patients due to conflict arising from both the patient and the faculty.

Females are considered to express feelings of empathy, unlike men who do not have empathetic "privilege". The nursing educational system has been designed to educate women or the nursing profession. Educators refer to situations with the word "she" and  the presentations in nursing school emphasize females in the history of nursing, while there is no presentation of males in the history of nursing.

There are several studies that indicate patients experience "stress" when their genitals and breasts are examined or assessed by male nurses.

Females many times form "clicks" were men are excluded and sexual comments and inuenndos are made on a regular basis.

All of this information tells us that we have a long way to go in order to change the discrimination of male nurses. All female nurses can do their part in realizing that men are equal, not just in other aspects in life but also in the nursing profession.