ROBIN WILLIAMS WAS SUFFERING FROM PARKINSONS

Robin Williams was suffering from parkinsons

Robin Williams was suffering from Parkinson's disease, according to his wife Susan Schneider.  

Although Robin had struggled with addiction, it was said that his "sobriety was intact." Robin also had a lifelong battle with depression, anxiety  and he spoke openly for years about his struggle with addiction.

His wife revealed on Thursday after reports circulated that the recovered alcoholic and drug addict may have fallen off the wagon.

“It is our hope in the wake of Robin’s tragic passing, that others will find the strength to seek the care and support they need to treat whatever battles they are facing so they may feel less afraid,” 

 

Actor Michael J. Fox, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's in the 90s  tweeted late on Thursday "Stunned to learn Robin had PD. Pretty sure his support for our Fdn predated his diagnosis. A true friend; I wish him peace."

 

 Williams was last seen alive at home by his wife at about 10 p.m. Sunday. There was an emergency call from his house in the San Francisco, Calif. to the Sheriff's Department shortly before noon Monday.

 

Marin County coroner revealed on Tuesday that Williams had committed suicide by hanging himself with a belt. He also had cuts on his wrist at the time of his death and was found in a seated position.

 

After undergoing heart surgery, Williams was said to be suffering from severe depression.

 

Last month Williams posed for a photo outside a Dairy Queen near a 12-step facility and a rep for WIlliams admitted the star was entering the program after working non stop, in order to "fine tune" his sobriety.

 

 

Williams was an  Oscar-winning actor and  had a successful career as a stand-up comedian. He made millions laugh with classic comedies like “Mrs. Doubtfire.”  And was so versatile in his acting skills that he also had a hit role in “Dead Poets Society.”

 

His untimely death will hopefully shed new light on depression and the importance of seeking quality help for people in all phases of the disease.  17 million people are diagnosed with depression every year and contrary to what some believe, you cannot cure yourself.  Seeking help quickly is key and it is extremely treatable.  

 

Robin was loved by millions and will be sadly missed.  From a nursing perspective, do you think the years of addiction, depression, anxiety and his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease played a role in his suicide?